The 60th Grammy Awards Belong to Bruno Mars

Bruno Mars poses in the press room with his awards for best R&B album, record of the year, album of the year, best engineered album, non-classical, for "24K Magic," and song of the year, best R&B performance and best R&B song, for "That's What I Like" at the 60th annual Grammy Awards at Madison Square Garden on Sunday, Jan. 28, 2018, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

Bruno Mars poses in the press room with his awards for best R&B album, record of the year, album of the year, best engineered album, non-classical, for “24K Magic,” and song of the year, best R&B performance and best R&B song, for “That’s What I Like” at the 60th annual Grammy Awards at Madison Square Garden on Sunday, Jan. 28, 2018, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

Bruno Mars has won the album of the year Grammy Award for 24K Magic, capping an epic night for the pop star. The award is Mars’ sixth win of the day.

Mars acknowledged fellow nominees in the category, including Jay-Z, Lorde and Childish Gambino. Mars says, “You guys are the reason I’m in the studio pulling my hair out.” Mars says, “My father, if you’re watching this, dad I love you. Look at me pop, I’m at the Grammys right now!”

Mars urged the Grammy Awards to not play him off the stage as the show had during one of his earlier wins, but the music did come up toward the end of his speech. Mars also performed his song Finesse with Cardi B earlier in the ceremony.

Grammy performances through the years have been hit and miss. But Kendrick Lamar created an entirely new category with an electrifying opener to Sunday night’s award show in New York. The rapper, who had eight nominations on the night, was joined on stage by Bono, The Edge and Dave Chappelle as well as dancers and a drummer. Transitioning from XXX to DNA, both from his Record Of The Year contender Damn, he broke off for an interlude from the U2 duo. Before launching into King’s Dead from the upcoming Black Panther soundtrack, Dave Chapelle then addressed the crowd. ‘I just wanted to remind the audience that the only thing more frightening than watching a Black man be honest in America, is being an honest Black man in America,’ he said. ‘Sorry for the interruption. Please continue.’ The breathtaking routine ended with each of his faceless dancers being shot in the head one by one as if by an unseen sniper, until the 30-year-old stood alone amid a stage strewn with bodies.

Tanya Hart has the Hollywood Live recap:

 

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