Corporations Take A Stand Against Gun Manufacturers

Wes Morosky, owner of Duke's Sport Shop. left, helps Ron Detka as he shops for a rifle on Friday, March 2, 2018, at his store in New Castle. Morosky said business has gone up recently, but that's thanks to the annual infusion of tax refund checks. Sales of firearms slowed dramatically after the election of President Donald Trump in 2016 allayed fears of a Democratic crackdown on gun owners. That trend continues, even with talk of gun control in Congress following the massacre of 17 people at a Florida high school last month. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

Wes Morosky, owner of Duke’s Sport Shop. left, helps Ron Detka as he shops for a rifle on Friday, March 2, 2018, at his store in New Castle. Morosky said business has gone up recently, but that’s thanks to the annual infusion of tax refund checks. Sales of firearms slowed dramatically after the election of President Donald Trump in 2016 allayed fears of a Democratic crackdown on gun owners. That trend continues, even with talk of gun control in Congress following the massacre of 17 people at a Florida high school last month. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

With Gary Ramey’s fledgling gun-making business taking off in retail stores, he decided to start offering one of his handguns for sale on his website. That didn’t sit well with the company he used to process payments, and they informed him they were dropping his account. Another credit card processing firm told him the same thing: They wouldn’t do business with him. The reason? His business of making firearms violates their policies.

In the wake of high-profile mass shootings, corporate America has been taking a stand against the firearms industry amid a lack of action by lawmakers on gun control. Payment processing firms are limiting transactions, Bank of America stopped providing financing to companies that make AR-style guns, and retailers like Walmart and Dick’s Sporting Goods imposed age restrictions on gun purchases.

The moves are lauded by gun-safety advocates but criticized by the gun industry that views them as a backhanded way of undermining the Second Amendment. Gun industry leaders see the backlash as a real threat to their industry and are coming to the conclusion that they need additional protections in Congress to prevent financial retaliation from banks.

“If a few banks say ‘No, we’re not going to give loans to gun dealers or gun manufacturers’, all of a sudden the industry is threatened, and the Second Amendment doesn’t mean much if there are no guns around,” said Michael Hammond, legal counsel for Gun Owners of America. “If you can’t make guns, if you can’t sell guns, the Second Amendment doesn’t mean much.”

The issue has already gotten the attention of the Republican who is chairman of the Senate Banking Committee. Sen. Mike Crapo of Idaho sent letters criticizing Bank of America and Citigroup, which decided to restrict sales of firearms by its business customers, over their new gun rules in the wake of the Florida high school shooting in February.

“We should all be concerned if banks like yours seek to replace legislators and policy makers and attempt to manage social policy by limiting access to credit,”