Judge Recuses in Trial of Chicago Police in Laquan McDonald Murder

Former Chicago police officer Joseph Walsh, left, and Chicago police officer Thomas Gaffney, right, depart the Cook County Courthouse after their arraignment on state felony charges of conspiracy in the investigation of the 2014 shooting death of Laquan McDonald Monday, July 10, 2017, in Chicago. The indictment marks the latest chapter in the history of a police force dogged by allegations of racism and brutality against the city's black residents. Both pled not guilty on all charges. (AP Photo/G-Jun Yam)

Three current and former Chicago police officers charged in the Laquan McDonald case pleaded not guilty in their first court appearance on Monday as the judge presiding over the case recused herself, NBC Chicago reported.

Former detective David March and officer Joseph Walsh, as well as current officer Thomas Gaffney, were indicted last month on charges of conspiracy, official misconduct and obstruction of justice for allegedly attempting to interfere with the investigation into the 2014 killing of the 17-year-old.

Judge Margaret Brosnahan recused herself moments before Monday’s arraignment, giving no reason behind the decision, according to NBC Chicago. The officers later pleaded not guilty to the charges and were released on a $50,000 bond.

All three officers were at the scene when Officer Jason Van Dyke fired the 16 shots that killed McDonald on October 20, 2014, according to special prosecutor Patricia Brown Holmes. Gaffney, Walsh ,Van Dyke’s partner at the time, and lead detective March gave conflicting accounts of what occurred, allegedly in order to protect Van Dyke. They allegedly claimed that McDonald was swinging a knife at the time of the shooting.