President Obama’s Final “My Brother’s Keeper” Summit: “This is just the beginning”

President Barack Obama speaks during a "My Brother's Keeper" summit in South Court Auditorium at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

President Barack Obama speaks during a “My Brother’s Keeper” summit in South Court Auditorium at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

President Barack Obama says his nearly three-year-old program to help boys and young men of color “is just the beginning.”

“We are going to keep these efforts going to invest in our young people, to break down barriers that keep them from getting ahead and make sure that they’ve got a chance to contribute.”

Addressing a daylong White House summit on the My Brother’s Keeper program, Obama urged more people to become mentors and help create opportunities for young people to stay on the right path. He says he’ll be involved with the program for the rest of his life.

The president launched the program in February 2014 to address persistent opportunity gaps facing boys and young men of color.

Initiatives at the federal level could be undone by the Trump administration. But White House officials say much of the work will continue after Donald Trump takes office because more than 250 communities around the country are running their own My Brother’s Keeper programs.

 


Watch President Obama’s full speech:

 


 

Watch full summit proceedings:

 

Source: AP