Report: Russia’s President Personally Involved With U.S. Election Hack

A journalist writes a material as she watches a live telecast of the U.S. presidential election standing at portraits of U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin in the Union Jack pub in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. Russia's lower house of parliament is applauding the election of Trump as U.S. president. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

A journalist writes a material as she watches a live telecast of the U.S. presidential election standing at portraits of U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin in the Union Jack pub in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. Russia’s lower house of parliament is applauding the election of Trump as U.S. president. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

 


U.S. intelligence officials now say that the Russian president was personally involved in meddling in the U.S. presidential election.  Sources told NBC News with “a high level of confidence” that Vladimir Putin “became personally involved in the covert Russian campaign”. Officials say Putin was involved to the point of directing how hacked information from the Democrats would be distributed, and Putin had a “vendetta” against Hillary Clinton.  Back in 2011, Clinton – then Secretary of State criticized Russia’s parliamentary elections.

The intel, according to the report, came from “diplomatic sources and spies working for U.S. allies.”

U.S. officials say Putin helped direct the use of hacked materials
Meantime, in reaction to the report, Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov on Thursday dismissed it as “laughable nonsense.”

Last week, the CIA released details of a secret assessment that concluded Russia tried to help President-elect Donald Trump win.

For his part, Trump continues to balk at the confirmed intelligence reports of Russian interference.

Amid the reports of Russian interference at least 10 members of the Electoral College have demanded to be briefed on intel related to the accusations, before they meet Monday, December 19th to officially finalize Trump’s victory.

It’s not likely that will happen as officials at the National Intelligence Agency–the agency which oversees U.S. intelligence–says they will not release more information the public until a review ordered by President Barack Obama is complete.

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence is responding to reports that the U.S. intelligence community is conflicted about whether Russian hacking was intended to help Donald Trump.

Obama has ordered a review of foreign interference in U.S. elections to be completed before he leaves office on Jan. 20.

 

(AURN)