Tidal Accuses of Forging Stream Numbers

 

File - In this May 4, 2015, file photo, Jay Z, left, and Beyonce arrive at The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute benefit gala celebrating "China: Through the Looking Glass" in New York. Country music power couple Faith Hill and Tim McGraw talk about what they admire about other musical couples, from Beyonce and Jay Z to Garth Brooks and Trisha Yearwood. “The truth is, I want to be Beyonce every single freaking night of my life,” Hill said.  (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

File – In this May 4, 2015, file photo, Jay Z, left, and Beyonce arrive at The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute benefit gala celebrating “China: Through the Looking Glass” in New York. Country music power couple Faith Hill and Tim McGraw talk about what they admire about other musical couples, from Beyonce and Jay Z to Garth Brooks and Trisha Yearwood. “The truth is, I want to be Beyonce every single freaking night of my life,” Hill said. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

Tidal is fighting back against a ‘smear campaign’.

The Jay Z-backed high-fidelity music streaming platform was accused this week of manipulating the streaming numbers on Kanye West’s and Beyonce’s albums by Norwegian newspaper Dagens Naeringsliv.

“This is a smear campaign from a publication that once referred to our employee as an ‘Israeli Intelligence officer’ and our owner as a ‘crack dealer,” a Tidal rep told Billboard, referring to Roc Nation exec Lior Tibon and Jay Z, respectively.

“We expect nothing less from them than this ridiculous story, lies and falsehoods. The information was stolen and manipulated and we will fight these claims vigorously.”

The newspaper’s core claim is that the platform inflated the play counts relating to Beyonce’s Lemonade and Kanye’s Life of Pablo albums and subsequently paid out higher royalty fees.

“Beyoncé’s and Kanye West’s listener numbers on TIDAL have been manipulated to the tune of several hundred million false plays… which has generated massive royalty payouts at the expense of other artists.”

Jay-Z bought the streaming platform in March 2015 for $56 million, through his Project Panther company.