From Bad to Worse for Haiti

A girl helps her mother to remove mud from her house after Hurricane Matthew flooded their home in Les Cayes, Haiti, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016. Two days after the storm rampaged across the country's remote southwestern peninsula, authorities and aid workers still lack a clear picture of what they fear is the country's biggest disaster in years. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

A girl helps her mother to remove mud from her house after Hurricane Matthew flooded their home in Les Cayes, Haiti, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016. Two days after the storm rampaged across the country’s remote southwestern peninsula, authorities and aid workers still lack a clear picture of what they fear is the country’s biggest disaster in years. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

The impoverished island nation of Haiti was still in the midst of rebuilding efforts from deadly 2010 earthquake, when Hurricane Matthew blew through this week.

The United Nations is describing the hurricane as Haiti’s worst humanitarian crisis since the earthquake six years ago.  The death toll from the storm has reached 330, and is expected to rise as waters recede and recovery efforts continue, and officials fear the storm could fuel an already deadly cholera epidemic in the region.

President Obama commented Haiti’s challenges today (Friday, 10/7/16) from FEMA headquarters.

Kim Lampkins has more …

Meantime, the White House says President Obama has been receiving updates on the urgent situation in Haiti. Top members of his team have been convening to formulate the government response.

You can also help immediately by donating to the Red Cross to assist the relief effort. Contribute online to the Red Cross, or donate $10 to be charged to your cell phone bill by texting “HAITI” to “90999.”  Find more ways to help through the Center for International Disaster Information.

Families of Americans living in Haiti are encouraged to contact the State Department at 888-407-4747.

Images and video from Twitter #Haiti

 

Source: AURN