40 Acres and a Mule: Reparations Gaining Momentum on Capitol Hill

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People wait for a distribution of masks and food from the Rev. Al Sharpton in the Harlem neighborhood of New York, after a new state mandate was issued requiring residents to wear face coverings in public due to the COVID-19 coronavirus, Saturday, April 18, 2020. "Inner-city residents must follow this mandate to ensure public health and safety," said Sharpton. The latest Associated Press analysis of available data shows that nearly one-third of those who have died from the coronavirus are African American, even though blacks are only about 14% of the population. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
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There is a growing chorus that is singing louder about the issue of reparations in the midst of the Black Lives Matter movement. Particularly as Black Americans are among the highest negatives of nearly all categories and the wealth gap widens during the pandemic. An earlier report say it will take 288 years to close the wealth gap.

April Ryan speaks with Congress member Brenda Lawrence (D-MI) who is a leading voice on Capitol Hill in support of a national plan for reparations for the descendants of enslaved Africans who were denied the right to work, education, property ownership, and the opportunity to build generational wealth.

Click ▶️ to listen to AURN Washington Bureau Chief April Ryan’s White House Report:

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., right, poses during a ceremonial swearing-in with Rep. Brenda Lawrence, D-Mich., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 3, 2019, during the opening session of the 116th Congress. Washington, Thursday, Jan. 3, 2019. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

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WHITE HOUSE REPORT