Celebrating 50 Years of Kwanzaa!

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The Tonel LaKay Drum and Dance ensemble, honoring the cultural heritage of Haiti, performs during the annual Kwanzaaa celebration at the Museum of Natural History, Sunday, Dec. 26, 2004, in New York. Kwanza, a celebration of family, community and culture, was established in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga to reaffirm a common identity, purpose and direction for African-American people and the world African community. (AP Photo/Jennifer Szymaszek)
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The Tonel LaKay Drum and Dance ensemble, honoring the cultural heritage of Haiti, performs during the annual Kwanzaaa celebration at the Museum of Natural History, Sunday, Dec. 26, 2004, in New York. Kwanza, a celebration of family, community and culture, was established in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga to reaffirm a common identity, purpose and direction for African-American people and the world African community. (AP Photo/Jennifer Szymaszek)

The Tonel LaKay Drum and Dance ensemble, honoring the cultural heritage of Haiti, performs during the annual Kwanzaaa celebration at the Museum of Natural History, Sunday, Dec. 26, 2004, in New York. Kwanza, a celebration of family, community and culture, was established in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga to reaffirm a common identity, purpose and direction for African-American people and the world African community. (AP Photo/Jennifer Szymaszek)

 

 

 

 

 


Happy Kwanzaa! The week long celebration of African heritage in African American culture commences on December 26th. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the holiday’s first observance in 1966.

Happy Kwanzaa! The week long celebration of African heritage in African American culture commences on December 26th. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the holiday’s first observance in 1966.

The holiday focuses on seven principles, known as Nguzo Saba (one for each day of the celebration), and were created by Dr. Maulana Karenga.


 

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Dr. Karenga writes on the official Kwanzaa website:

“As an African American and Pan-African holiday celebrated by millions throughout the world African community, Kwanzaa brings a cultural message which speaks to the best of what it means to be African and human in the fullest sense. Given the profound significance Kwanzaa has for African Americans and indeed, the world African community, it is imperative that an authoritative source and site be made available to give an accurate and expansive account of its origins, concepts, values, symbols and practice.”

A candle-lighting ceremony each evening provides the opportunity to gather and discuss the meaning of Kwanzaa.

An African feast, called a Karamu, is held on December 31.

Click on image below for video about the history of Kwanzaa from history.com.

(AURN)

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