A Step Forward, But Miles to Go: Highlighting Black Maternal Health Challenges

Black women continue to face disproportionately high risks, with maternal mortality rates of 49.5 deaths per 100,000 live births, more than twice as high as their counterparts.

by

Ansonia Lyons carries her son, Adrien Lyons, as she takes him for a diaper change in Birmingham, Ala., on Saturday, Feb. 5, 2022. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows maternal mortality rates in the U.S. doubled between 1999 and 2019, that Native American and Alaskan Native populations had the largest rate increase and that, overall, Black maternal mortality rates were the highest. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)
Reading Time: < 1 minute

According to a new report from the CDC, the United States has recorded a significant decline in maternal mortality rates, with 2022 figures showing a decrease from 22.3 deaths per 100,000 live births, down sharply from 32.9 in 2021.

This improvement follows a severe spike in maternal deaths during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the positive trend masks a distressing reality; Black women continue to face disproportionately high risks, with maternal mortality rates of 49.5 deaths per 100,000 live births, more than twice as high as their counterparts. 

This persistent disparity highlights the deep-seated inequalities in health care that still need urgent addressing. The decline in overall maternal mortality may partly stem from reduced COVID-19 cases, yet the specific challenges affecting Black mothers remain prevalent.


Click play to listen to the report from AURN White House Correspondent Ebony McMorris. For more news, follow @E_N_McMorris & @aurnonline.

advanced divider
advanced divider
Advertisement