Countering Racism: Project SERV Grants Bolster HBCUs in Bomb Threat Aftermath

In the wake of last year's bomb threats, which cause fear and disruption on these HBCU communities, these funds will bolster mental health services and other crucial supports.

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FILE - A graduation themed printed mural is seen on the Howard University campus, July 6, 2021, in Washington. More than a third of America’s 101 historically Black colleges and universities have been targeted by calls or emails threatening bombings since early January. Howard University in Washington has received at least four threats since Jan. 4. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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The U.S. Department of Education unveiled a new batch of Project School Emergency Response to Violence (SERV) grants. These grants are going to four historically Black colleges and universities disrupted by bomb threats last year that were found to be racially motivated.

Texas Southern University has been awarded over $191,000; Delaware State, $217,000; Claflin University, $440,000; and Howard University, $203,000. Projects SERV provides short-term funding to educational bodies experiencing violent or traumatic incidents and aims to restore a safe learning environment. More grants are expected to be issued in the coming weeks.

In the wake of last year’s bomb threats, which cause fear and disruption on these HBCU communities, these funds will bolster mental health services and other crucial supports. The Biden administration continues to stand firmly with HBCUs condemning any racist efforts to terrorize these institutions.


Click play to listen to the report from AURN White House Correspondent Ebony McMorris. For more news, follow @E_N_McMorris & @aurnonline.

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