On Jan. 1, President Joe Biden celebrated the 160th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation

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Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., speaks about freedom at an event sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and Howard University to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial Monday, Sept. 17, 2012, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
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In this Wednesday, April 8, 2015 photo, Robert Davis, a Civil War re-enactor, poses for a portrait outside the tomb of Abraham Lincoln with a bust of Lincoln in the background, in Springfield, Ill. A local Lincoln buff, Davis is also directing a youth drama about the Emancipation Proclamation. (AP Photo/Randy Squires)

On Jan. 1, President Joe Biden celebrated the 160th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation. Biden said in a statement, “On New Year’s Day, 160 years ago today, President Abraham Lincoln changed America’s destiny forever. We were at the height of a raging Civil War, ‘a house divided’ along the dangerous fault line of slavery. “Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation did not end slavery. The document only applied to states that were in rebellion, and over which President Lincoln had no control. The Emancipation Proclamation was a war document that did allow Black people to fight in the civil war if they escaped the south to  enlist in the Union Army. Slavery was officially abolished in December 1865 with the 13th amendment.

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