Thurgood Marshall Center Trust Celebrates 68th Anniv. of Brown v. Board of Education

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Linda Brown Smith, left, of Topeka, Kansas, and Benjamin L. Hooks, executive director of the NAACP, are shown on the steps of the South Carolina State House during ceremonies observing the 25th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark ruling in the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka in Columbus, S.C., May 17, 1979. Brown was the plaintiff in the case that resulted in the 1954 landmark ruling in favor of school desegregation. (AP Photo/Lou Krasky)
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Sixty-eight years ago, the Supreme Court decided the historic Brown v. Board of Education case, ending segregation in education. The Thurgood Marshall Center Trust marked the historic landmark with an event where guest speaker Rawle Andrews Jr., the executive director for the American Psychiatric Association, talked about decisions leading up to Brown v. Board of Education.

The law changed… because by 1968, we had the Kerner Commission report… separate and unequal. If it takes a court order… to tell you that you have rights, how many rights do you have anyway?

“Dred Scott–1857. That’s not critical race theory, that’s true… it’s in the book. Plessy v. Ferguson–1896. It’s not critical race theory, it’s in the book. Brown v. Board of Education–’54. Sixty-eighth anniversary, but guess what happened? The law changed… because by 1968, we had the Kerner Commission report… separate and unequal. If it takes a court order… to tell you that you have rights, how many rights do you have anyway?”

Click ▶️ to listen to AURN Washington Correspondent Ebony McMorris’s report: 

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