Emails Show Don Jr. Embraced Help Said to be from Kremlin

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File- Thgis July 20, 2016, file photo shows Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump, right, and his son Donald Trump, Jr., watching as Eric Trump addresses the delegates during the third day session of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. Trump is asserting that countries like France that he says are compromised by terrorism may be subjected to the “extreme vetting” he proposes as a deterrent to attacks in the U.S. When asked if his proposal might lead to a point when not a lot of people from overseas are allowed into the U.S., Trump said, “Maybe we get to that point” and added: “We have to be smart and we have to be vigilant and we have to be strong.” (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
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Donald Trump’s eldest son revealed Tuesday that he was eager to hear damaging information about Hillary Clinton from the Russian government, disclosing a series of emails that marked the clearest sign to date that Trump’s campaign was willing to consider election help from a longtime U.S. adversary.

The email exchange posted to Twitter by Donald Trump Jr. showed him conversing with a music publicist who wanted him to meet with a “Russian government attorney” who supposedly had dirt on Clinton as “part of Russia and its government’s support for Mr. Trump.”

 

The messages reveal that Trump Jr. was told the Russian government had information that could “incriminate” Clinton and her dealings with Russia. ‘I love it,” Trump Jr. said in one email response.

Democrats in Congress voiced outrage and insisted the messages showed clear collusion, with California Rep. Adam Schiff, the top Democrat on the House intelligence committee, declaring that “all of the campaign’s previous denials obviously now have to be viewed in a different context.” Yet Republicans, who stand the most to lose politically from Trump’s Russia ordeal, did not join in the condemnation. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he was confident Senate investigators would “get to the bottom of whatever happened.” And Sen. Susan Collins, a Maine Republican on the intelligence committee, cautioned that the emails were “only part of the picture.”

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